Menu Magic – Enhancing Your Tavern, One Drink at a Time

beer-barrel-keg-cask-oak (1)Nearly every adventuring party ends up in a tavern at some point of time or another. Sometimes, they’re a place of great importance for a plotline or a quest, and sometimes the party just wants to celebrate/commiserate over recent events. Either way – there are times when you’ll need to come up with a tavern on the fly, and while a name and NPCs can be easy enough, once they want to look at a menu, you might find yourself scrambling to determine a level of detail that you might not be prepared for. I personally have created a tavern menu in Barovia where the place ONLY sells stew (and if you want it to be fancy, they’ll throw on a sprig of parsley), because I was caught off guard. Taverns, while so essential to so many D&D campaigns, are often overlooked – especially their menus. We wanted to provide…

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Gods or Angels? A guest post by Yvonne Aburrow

A Pilgrim in Narnia

The Inklings and Paganism

Before he became a Christian, C.S. Lewis was deeply inspired by ancient Pagan mythology, and he continued to value it as mythopoeia after his conversion, and seems to have sought to reconcile the Christian worldview with the ancient Pagan one (for example in That Hideous Strength). Lewis was also fascinated by the symbolism of astrology: a practice and worldview which started in Pagan antiquity and continued well into the Christian era. Lewis’ book,The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature, deals in part with astrological symbolism as part of the medieval worldview. Michael Ward has also suggested that Lewis intended the seven Narnia books to be an extended allegory of planetary symbolism. Whether or not he set out to make each book correspond to the themes of a particular planet is not settled; it is however possible to interpret them in…

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The Tolkien Letter that Every Lover of Middle-earth Must Read

A Pilgrim in Narnia

It is sort of a trick, isn’t it? Any true Tolkien fan will say that every page in The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien is essential. However, not everyone enjoys letters as much as I do. Some might absolutely love The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, but don’t find great joy peeking into the lives of authors by reading their mail. I may well be the odd man out.

However, embedded in the bits and pieces of correspondence that remain are some absolute gems. It is in these letters that we discover that Tolkien supported C.S. Lewis in his first foray into fiction. We see the heart-crushing weight of work that Tolkien was faced with, and the struggles that he had to complete The Lord of the Rings. And we have the moments, finally, when he finished his work and made it ready for publication. The letters…

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Ballads of War – Class Column: Bard

Ron the DM

   Weavers of magic, song, poetry and lore – lock up your loved ones as the Bard enters the tavern to make hearts swoon, adventurers bolstered for battle and townsfolk told of daring heroics….

Today I want to talk about the Bard. I had thought about doing class columns for the blog, and wasn’t entirely sure on the route I wanted to go: mechanics? or lore? And I thought to myself: why not both? So to kick us off in our class columns is the bard. 

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Dungeon Masters Helping Each Other

Adventures in Nerdery

About a week ago I got into a conversation with a couple of people on Twitter about being a Dungeon Master and how it’s essentially a very solitary role. It all started because I felt a hankering to create a new campaign setting, but with a twist. I wanted to create it with other DMs. I wanted input from other Dungeon Masters, and for each of us to build our own sections of this world that we would eventually be able to show to players. Like a kind of gift to the rpg and D&D community. Not a setting devised and created by one person, but a collective of DMs all putting their unique stamp on it, creating a wholly new and different world where each nation feels different than the other. I thought if nothing else it would be a fun exercise and chance to meet and learn from…

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20 D&D Bard Quest Ideas

A bunch of great ideas here! I think 13, 19 & 20 are my faves. Lots of juicy roleplaying opportunities there.

Boccob's Blessed Blog

19884306_485451788460461_287014972355554622_n Yeah, that’s a gelatinous cube in a thong. Art by Mia Johnson.

Today we have a guest blogger, Mia Johnson from Tipsy Badger. She has prepared 20 D&D Quest Ideas for bards.

  1. The children of the surround farmland have been disappearing, some say a satyr play his flute just on the edge of the woods, enticing them to join his dance.
  2. Despite the disappearing members and strange accidents happening around the traveling circus, the troupe seeks new headliners for this evening’s show.
  3. A haunting melody rouses the party from their sleep to see a ghostly veiled woman drifting towards a pond, beckoning the party with her hand before sinking below the water.
  4. Drunken revelry draws the party’s attention to  a crowd of townsfolk gathered round a fighting pit, the betting pot valuing a small fortune.
  5. The whole town decorated in fresh flowers and summer banners, many walls and posts…

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